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English Muffin Bread (aka a very, very easy bread recipe)

How to make no-knead English muffin bread

Kneading is probably the number one thing that discourages people from making bread.  I did write a “How to knead” post, but in case you are still terrified of kneading, I have a recipe that requires no such thing!

In addition, it only needs to rise one time, so it’s a good first yeast bread recipe to try.

Totally not-scary.

You will need a stand mixer, though, because this recipe uses the mixer’s strength in place of kneading.

(I have the KitchenAid Artisan Series 5-Quart Mixer and it is marvelous.  Highly recommend it.)

Like English muffins, this bread has a somewhat hole-y texture, and it’s at its best when toasted.

sliced English muffin bread

And of course, butter and jam elevate it to heavenly levels.

jam and butter on toast

Here’s how to make some for yourself.

Combine 3 cups of all-purpose flour with the yeast, sugar, baking soda, and salt in a mixer bowl.

dry ingredients for english muffin bread

Heat liquids to 120-125  °F (I do this in the microwave).

Add warm liquids to dry ingredients in mixer bowl, and mix for 2 minutes.

It will be rather runny at this point.
img_2796

Add remaining flour and beat for two minutes. The dough will be quite thick.

english muffin dough

Spray two 8.5 x 4.5 inch loaf pans with nonstick spray and then sprinkle with cornmeal.

You can use 9×5 inch bread pans, but your loaves will be flatter and a little less attractive.  Still tasty, though!

grease pan and sprinkle with cornmeal

I do this the same way that I grease and flour a cake pan…I put the cornmeal in and tilt and shake the pan until it’s evenly covered.

My recipe says to pour the dough into the pans, but this dough is so thick, pouring is an impossiblity!

I usually try to roughly divide it in two using a metal spoon, but I normally get it wrong and have to take some dough from one pan and put it in the other.

spoon dough into pan

I smooth the dough out a bit with wet fingertips, but you don’t have to worry about it being pristinely neat…the lumps and bumps will straighten themselves out as the dough rises.

You do want the pans to have relatively equal amounts of dough, though, or the loaves will need different baking times.

english muffin bread ready to rise

Cover with a wet tea towel (the type of towel that is not fluffy) and let it rise in a warm place for an hour.

dough covered with wet tea towel

After rising for an hour, it should look like this.

risen English muffin bread

Bake the risen loaves in a preheated 350 °F degree oven for 25-30 minutes.

Turn the loaves out of the pans and cool on a wire rack.

Here’s what the finished product should look like.

baked no knead English muffin bread

And here’s the inside texture.

sliced English muffin bread

Because this dough has very little fat and sugar (which are preserving agents), it will only stay fresh for a day or two on the countertop.

toast with raspberry jam

It freezes well, though, so eat one loaf and freeze the other, because if you need a little something to go with dinner on a busy night, it’s awfully handy to have a loaf waiting for you in the freezer.

If you have a small household, another option is to cut the loaves in half and freeze each half individually. That way you only have a half loaf to contend with each time.

toast with raspberry jam

No-Knead English Muffin Bread

Yield: 2 loaves
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 40 minutes

This easy yeast bread requires no-kneading! It's a foolproof, beginner-friendly recipe.

Ingredients

  • 6 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 packages (4.5 teaspoons) active dry yeast
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • cornmeal for dusting pans

Instructions

  1. Combine 3 cups of all-purpose flour with the yeast, sugar, baking soda, and salt in a mixer bowl.
  2. Heat liquids to 120-125 degrees; add warm liquids to dry ingredients in mixer bowl, and mix for 2 minutes. It will be rather runny at this point.
  3. Add remaining flour and beat for two minutes (dough will be thick).
  4. Spray two 8.5 x 4.5 inch loaf pans with nonstick spray and then sprinkle with cornmeal. Using a metal spoon, divide the dough evenly between the two pans. Cover with a wet tea towel and let rise in a warm place for an hour.
  5. Bake in a preheated 350 degree F oven for 25-30 minutes. Turn the loaves out of the pans and cool on a wire rack.
  6. To serve, slice and toast, then top with butter (and jam if you wish). Freeze to keep longer than 2 days.

Notes

This bread contains very little fat or sugar, which means it doesn't keep long. Be sure to freeze what you won't eat in a day or two.

Nutrition Information
Yield 30 Serving Size 1 slice
Amount Per Serving Calories 116Total Fat 1gSaturated Fat 0gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 0gCholesterol 1mgSodium 92mgCarbohydrates 23gFiber 1gSugar 1gProtein 4g
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P.S. My favorite bread pans, cooling rack, and mixer are listed in this post.

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Babs

Saturday 13th of March 2021

I baked for 25 min. Had a huge hole in the middle. It’s still yummy but what did I do wrong?

Kristen

Sunday 14th of March 2021

Hmm, possibly you just had one really huge air bubble there? Was the texture of the bread around the hole fine?

Jasmine

Tuesday 21st of April 2020

Have you tried this with non-dairy milk?

Kristen

Wednesday 22nd of April 2020

I haven't, but I've successfully used coconut milk in a number of other yeast bread recipes. I think using rice milk, oat milk, almond milk, coconut milk, or soy milk would all work just fine. The milks that have more fat in them will probably work the best, though (coconut milk over rice milk, for example).

Michelle

Monday 20th of January 2020

I have used this recipe for years and love it! Have you ever replaced some of the white flour with wheat flour? I want to try to make it a bit more healthy since it is a daily item on our menu. Thanks!

Kristen

Monday 20th of January 2020

I've tried a 50/50 white/wheat combo and that works pretty well.

Diane C

Saturday 20th of April 2019

When you first posted this, I didn't have a Kitchenaid mixer or muffin rings. Now I have both. Do you think I could I use this recipe as-is with muffin rings? Obvs the cooking time would be less, but any other thoughts?

Kristen

Saturday 20th of April 2019

To make regular individual English muffins, you mean? I don't use rings for those...I go free form: https://www.thefrugalgirl.com/wednesday-baking-homemade-english-muffins/

But I imagine that this kind of dough might work in the rings. I'd definitely be inclined to at least do an initial browning step on a griddle before baking them, though. Otherwise they might resemble rolls more than English muffins.

If you try it, do report back!

smh

Thursday 5th of July 2018

This was the first thing I made in my new KitchenAid mixer. Delicious. My dough was fully risen after about 45-50 minutes (77 degrees in the house).

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